ARTESOLESP E-journal receives submissions of unpublished manuscripts on any topic related to the area of ESP. Each manuscript must include the names, affiliation, and e-mail addresses of all authors, an abstract of no more than 300 words, and a list of five to seven keywords. A brief biographical statement (maximum 100 words, in sentence format) for each author is also required, (this information will be removed when the articles are distributed for blind review). Articles should be submitted in Microsoft Word or RTF document format. Full-length articles should be no more than 6.000 words in length, excluding appendixes.

ARTESOLESP Journal follows the guidelines of the sixth edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association published by the American Psychological Association (APA).

Manuscripts submitted to ESP Journal must conform to APA format.

Four categories of manuscripts will be received: contributions, research articles, pedagogical experiences in ESP, and reviews.

Contributions

In this section, articles by prestigious ESP specialists will be published.

Research Articles

This is a section devoted to the publication of research articles which will be refereed by our Academic Editorial Board.

  • Articles should report original research.

  • Full-length articles should be no more than 6,500 words in length, excluding appendixes.

  • Each submission should include an abstract of no more than 300 words, and a list of five to seven keywords.  All article manuscripts submitted to ARTESOLESP Journal will go through a two-step review process.

  • Biodata of the author (s) should be included. (No more than 70 words)

Research articles should generally include the following sections:

1- Abstract

2- Five to seven keywords.

3- The introduction should include:

  • The research issue

  • The underlying theoretical framework.

  • A description of the methodological tradition in which the study was conducted.

  • Research hypotheses or questions.

4- Method section:

  • Description of participants and research context.

  • A detailed description of data collection and analysis procedures.

  • Description of the apparatus or materials used.

  • Explanation of the procedures and the steps in the research

5- Results section:

  • Presentation of graphs and tables that help to explain the results.

  • For quantitative research, presentation of descriptive and inferential statistics used to analyze the data.

  • For qualitative research, data should reflect prolonged engagement, observation, and triangulation.

6- Discussion section:

  • An evaluation and interpretation of the results.

  • Discussion of alternative explanations.

  • Causal inferences should be cautiously made.

  • Results of the study should not be overly interpreted or generalized.

  • Linking the results obtained in the study to original hypotheses.

  • Presentation of the implications and any limitations of the study.

7– Conclusion:

  • Summary and general implications of the study.

  • Suggestions for further research

8– References in APA format.

9– Appendixes of instrument(s) used.

Pedagogical experiences in ESP

This section includes the description of new experiences (strategies, techniques, course design) within ESP.

Submissions should include:

  • An abstract of no more than 300 words, and a list of five keywords.

  • A report of original pedagogical experiences: teaching techniques and methodologies, management of different teaching situations, testing and assessment, materials development.

  • The following sections and information should be included :

Institutional or individual project.

Type of institution, primary school, secondary school, teaching training college, university, school of English.

Number of periods a week devoted to the teaching of English.

Duration of the project.

Students’ profile

Language level of students, mother tongue.

Age of students (children, teenagers, adults)

Theoretical framework

  • Background, frame of reference, sources. Justify your choice

Materials

  • Types of materials used. Examples.

Project or experience

Detailed description of the project or experience.

Outcome

Pedagogical implications

Reviews

This section includes reviews of books, journals and teaching materials published by Universities, Teacher Training Colleges and other institutions interested in the development of ESP courses or studies.

Reviews of individual books, journals or reading instructional software should not be longer than 1,600 words. The following information should be included at the beginning of the review:

  • Author(s)

  • Title

  • Publication date

  • Publisher

  • Publisher City and Country

  • Number of pages

  • A biodata of the author (s) should be included. (No more than 70 words)

REVIEW PROCESS

All manuscripts submitted to ARTESOLESP Journal will go through a two-step review process.

  • Internal review

The editors of the journal will first review each manuscript to see if it meets the basic requirements for articles published in the journal.

  • External review

Submissions that meet the requirements stated above will be sent out for peer review from two to three experts in the field. This second review process takes 2–3 months. When this process is finished, the authors will receive copies of the external reviewers’ comments and will be notified as to the decision (acceptance, acceptance with changes, or rejection).

GENERAL PUBLICATION POLICIES

The following policies apply to all articles, reviews, and commentaries:

1. All submissions must conform to the requirements of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th edition). Authors are responsible for the accuracy of references and citations, which must be in APA format.

2. Manuscripts that have already been published elsewhere or are being considered for publication elsewhere will not be considered for publication in ARTESOLESP Journal. It is the responsibility of the author to inform the editor of the existence of any similar work that is already published or under consideration for publication elsewhere.

3. Authors of accepted manuscripts will assign to ARTESOLESP Journal the permanent right to electronically distribute the article.

4. The editors of ARTESOLESP Journal reserve the right to make editorial changes in any manuscript accepted for publication for the sake of style or clarity. Authors will be consulted only if the changes are substantial.

5. Articles are copyrighted by their respective authors, but if published after electronic appearance,

ARTESOLESP Journal will be acknowledged as the initial locus of publication.

DISCLAIMER

The Editorial Board of ARTESOL ESP Journal informs readers that the views, thoughts, findings, conclusions and recommendations expressed in the articles published in the Journal are the personal statements of their respective authors who are responsible for all contents, including the accuracy of the facts, claims, and references. The Editorial Board will not take any responsibility for any omissions and possible violations of third party rights with respect to the material contained herein.

By electronic mail, send the material to: artesolespjournal@gmail.com

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Friday, May 10, 11:30 -12:15

1. LOPEZ CASOLI, Marina

Rubrics for EFL writing instruction in secondary school

Research paper

Room 101

A growing concern among EFL teachers is that no matter how much written work from their students they correct, many students do not improve their writing. In view of this concern, this presentation will describe an on-going investigation into the training of rubric use to improve the writing skill of EFL students in secondary school. The purpose of this study in progress is to determine whether the systematic use of a rubric can help students not only improve their writing by becoming aware of their errors but also become more autonomous writers beyond the guided classroom context.

2. SÁNCHEZ, Jorge

The distribution of the rhetorical sections in RA abstracts

Research paper

Room 102

The textual architecture of research article (RA) abstracts may vary according to disciplinary field. Knowledge of how abstracts are structurally organized may also provide insights into how authors arrange their information in abstracts. Therefore, the presenter will describe the order of the moves and steps established by the CARS model as well as the rhetorical sections not captured by this framework based on a corpus of 92 informative research article abstracts from the field of applied linguistics. He will also report on the most/least common rhetorical sequences, the recurrence of the moves and steps, among other issues.

3. NELSON, Andrew

Effective methods for teaching idioms in the L2 classroom

Demonstration

Room 103

Using idioms appropriately can be complicated. Given the complexity and frequency of various idioms, instructors should dedicate some of their class time to teaching them; however, instructors may not have a logical method for doing so. During this 45-minute demonstration, the presenter will describe an effective technique for teaching idioms that includes schema building, elicitation, scaffolding, and awareness-raising. Additionally, participants will realize that idioms are easier to learn when presented thematically and that creating independent practice activities related to the same theme is more memorable for students.

4. ALDORINO, Rita; GUTIERREZ BARCENA, Melina; MAMANI, Ana del Rosario; MOLINA, Emanuel

Exploring literature in the EFL class: discovering new worlds

Poster

Room 104

Bringing literature into the EFL class can be a timeless opening to include a wide range of content and tasks to help develop diverse skills. The opportunities that arise from including Literature in the English class may open doors for students and teachers to explore the language, the culture, and the different perceptions that are needed to make this an enriching experience. In this poster session, attendees will have access to an alternative pedagogic strategy to incorporate Literature the EFL class, and will be able to observe how these activities can promote diverse skills and expand learners’ views about language.

Friday, May 10, 15:15 – 16:00

5. INNOCENTINI, Viviana

A study of interaction in scientific discourse

Research paper

Room 101

Interest in scientific and academic discourse has been on the rise over the last decades, with numerous studies addressing research papers and their abstracts as the main genres to be analyzed. A solid body of research exists on the stereotypical rhetorical organization patterns of moves and steps -or sub-functions- of these genres, yet interaction and negotiation within the discourse community remain to be further investigated. This study explores interaction in abstracts within the framework of metadiscourse from a contrastive rhetoric perspective. The presenter will refer to its theoretical-methodological frame, the process of corpus construction and analysis, and preliminary findings.

6. BERARDO, Eliana

Direct vs. indirect feedback in EFL writing

Research paper

Room 102

Is it necessary that writing instructors provide solutions for their students’ mistakes, or should they point them out and let students find a solution on their own? The presenter will begin by summarizing recent research on the matter and she will continue to present the results of her own study on the effectiveness of direct and indirect feedback in helping first and third-year EFL college students improve their compositions in academic writing courses. A quantitative and qualitative analysis of the first and second draft of their assignments was carried out to draw conclusions and propose plans to improve feedback practice.

7. GONZÁLEZ, María Susana, ALBINI, María Claudia; ROCCA, Ana María

Application of a Reading Comprehension Model to Academic Texts

Demonstration

Room 103

In the reading comprehension courses in English at a state university in Argentina, a model of academic text reading that responds to the tenets of a strategic, interactive reading approach has been developed considering students with a low level of knowledge of the foreign language (mainly A1-CPF). In this demonstration, the presenters will apply this reading model to short academic texts and the audience will participate as students. The aim of the demonstration is to show how it is possible to help students become strategic readers and abandon linear reading in a short instruction period.

8. CASTIÑEIRA, Beatriz; MUCCI, María Rosa

Too academic to play games? Jeopardy at university

Demonstration

Room 104

Many popular games are usually included in ESL/EFL classrooms with the intention of transforming a learning activity into an engaging experience. For example, Jeopardy is a classic game in different fields such as accounting, chemistry or health care. In this demonstration the presenters will show how this game can be used not only as an ice breaker but also as an evaluation tool. They will also share the benefits that the game provides following an experience with students in higher education.

Friday, May 10, 16:30-18:00

9. MONTÉ, Nylia

Brain matters! Enrich your classes with Brain-based Learning

Workshop

Room Aula Magna

Knowing how the brain works is essential for teachers to select strategies and design activities that go hand in hand with how students’ brains learn. In a fun way, using a variety of interactive activities, this workshop will bring teachers closer to a very wise way of teaching: Brain-based Learning. We will learn very practical ways to enrich our students’ brains by applying knowledge from the field of Neurosciences and Education.

Friday, May 10, 16:30 – 17:15

10. TISCORNIA, Teresa

Making thinking visible in the Literature classroom

Demonstration

Room 101

The presenter will begin by introducing the theory of Visible Thinking as a valuable tool to promote motivation in the Literature classroom and achieve higher -order thinking. In today´s diverse classrooms it has become fundamental to build a culture of independent thinkers who nourish from the thinking process itself as well as the thinking of others. She will then share a concrete set of strategies to incorporate thinking routines into everyday literature lessons as a creative, original way to approach Literature and to value independent thinking as an aim in itself.

11. CAICEDO, Vladimir

Unleash your Power…Point. Teaching resources to foster motivation – CANCELED

Demonstration

Room 102

Grammar teaching has always been a matter of concern in the EFL classroom due to its prescriptive nature. Several teachers only rely on ELT textbooks to teach grammar, posing limitations on students’ engagement and motivation since most textbooks’ contents and themes lack of relatedness to students’ daily life context and their approach to practice is monotonous. This presentation will walk participants through the basic principles of theme-based learning and gamification to design teaching and learning resources on PowerPoint based on students’ interests to foster intrinsic motivation in the ELT classroom.

Friday, May 10, 17:20 – 18:05

12. BERARDO, Eliana

Direct vs. indirect feedback in EFL writing

Research paper

Room 102

Is it necessary that writing instructors provide solutions for their students’ mistakes, or should they point them out and let students find a solution on their own? The presenter will begin by summarizing recent research on the matter and she will continue to present the results of her own study on the effectiveness of direct and indirect feedback in helping first and third-year EFL college students improve their compositions in academic writing courses. A quantitative and qualitative analysis of the first and second draft of their assignments was carried out to draw conclusions and propose plans to improve feedback practice.

13. PISTORIO, María Inés

Explicit and implicit listening strategy instruction in EFL

Research paper

Room 103

This study presents a model of listening strategy based instruction applied to secondary school students in Córdoba with an elementary level of English. A Background Questionnaire and a Strategy Questionnaire were used in order to collect information at the beginning and at the end of the study. The listening strategy training involved explicit and implicit instruction in cognitive, compensation, metacognitive and social affective strategies used in listening comprehension. It is concluded that explicit instruction improved students’ listening competence more than implicit instruction. This work also reveals that motivation positively influences the teaching and learning of English as a foreign language.

14. CASTIÑEIRA, Beatriz; MUCCI, María Rosa

Too academic to play games? Jeopardy at university

Demonstration

Room 104

Many popular games are usually included in ESL/EFL classrooms with the intention of transforming a learning activity into an engaging experience. For example, Jeopardy is a classic game in different fields such as accounting, chemistry or health care. In this demonstration the presenters will show how this game can be used not only as an ice breaker but also as an evaluation tool. They will also share the benefits that the game provides following an experience with students in higher education.

Saturday, May 11, 10:15 – 11:45

15. PLOUGH, India

Creating communicative activities to build grammar

Workshop

Room Aula Magna

Consensus-reaching tasks are ideal for promoting authentic, purposeful interaction between students. In this workshop, we will review the communicative functions, grammatical structures, and vocabulary that can be built into these task types for students at different proficiency levels. We will also discuss possible rubrics to assess student performance, depending on the pedagogical focus. Teachers will create several tasks and leave the workshop with a template for creating additional consensus-reaching tasks.

16. MONTÉ, Nylia

Games to spice up your classes!

Workshop

Room 102

Having fun in class is a serious thing! Come to this workshop and learn simple ways to spice up your lessons with lots of games. Learn the benefits of using them in class and take home a new collection of games to use with students of different ages and levels.

17. VAZQUEZ, Esther

How to boost deep learning through brain-compatible teaching

Workshop

Room 103

The brain is the organ of learning. No one doubts it. Yet, it has just been over the last years that some key information about “brain- compatible teaching” has shed light on how to promote better teaching-learning experiences. In this workshop the presenter and attendees will share some of these latest findings and move on to classify familiar classroom practices as brain-compatible or brain-antagonistic in accordance with existing data. Last, they will join in a discussion on how to introduce methodologies that help to create resonant learning environments that facilitate and promote lifelong learning.

Saturday, May 11, 12:00 – 12:45

18. ORTIZ, Patricia; INSIRILLO, Patricia

The impact of reading instruction on students’ VLS profile

Research paper

Room 101

The purpose of the study is to explore how reading comprehension instruction without overt vocabulary learning strategy (VLS) treatment impacts on the students’ strategic profile detected at the beginning of their instruction period in the School of Philosophy and Arts at state university in Argentina. The results and discussion here presented are a continuation of a previous work where students’ VLS profile previous to instruction was mapped out as a starting point to inquire about how reading instruction may or may not modify such profile.

19. PISTORIO, María Inés

Explicit and implicit listening strategy instruction in EFL

Research paper

Room 102

This study presents a model of listening strategy based instruction applied to secondary school students in Córdoba with an elementary level of English. A Background Questionnaire and a Strategy Questionnaire were used in order to collect information at the beginning and at the end of the study. The listening strategy training involved explicit and implicit instruction in cognitive, compensation, metacognitive and social affective strategies used in listening comprehension. It is concluded that explicit instruction improved students’ listening competence more than implicit instruction. This work also reveals that motivation positively influences the teaching and learning of English as a foreign language.

20. VILLALBA, Alfredo Andrés

Flipped Learning activities with smartphones, tablets and laptops

Workshop

Room 103

In this workshop, the presenter will discuss how flipped learning techniques can be used in the teaching of English. Technology is used in flipped learning classrooms to teach languages as well as other subjects. During the workshop, teachers will learn how to plan, organise, design and create flipped activities to use in class when teaching literature and getting students to practice writing, reading, listening and speaking.

21. NACAMULI KLEBS, Débora

Customized tests for 21st C (customized) students

Demonstration

Room 104

Assessment is an important process to evaluate and measure students’ learning progress and acquisition of skills (Hughes, 2017; Ur, 2012). Measurement procedures should consist of varied tools and instruments. Although many times assessment tools come in the form of pre-prepared tests, teachers may feel they fail to mirror classroom work because of their ‘generic nature’ (Tennant, 2018) leaving no other alternative but to resort to a customized instrument. This presentation will disclose issues around designing “customized” tests so that they reflect students’ abilities and capacities.

Saturday, May 11, 14:00 – 15:30

22. FLORES, Mónica

Boosting vocabulary learning through technology

Workshop

Room 101

This workshop aims to provide English instructors of all levels with engaging technological tools to support students’ vocabulary learning process. First, the rationale behind the goals and benefits of using technology to teach vocabulary will be presented and participants will explore the use of technological tools individually, in pairs or in groups. To conclude, the presenter will then pose some reflective questions to the audience.

23. BREIBURD, Silvia

Assess Gen Zers for success. And save the stress

Workshop

Room 102

ELT professionals face unprecedented challenges to reach 21 century students. This presentation will reveal how addressing distinct attributes of the digital generations and using effective assessment strategies, may create better classroom climate, facilitate teaching and enhance Gen Z learning. Along the workshop, the presenter will relate generational traits to evidence-based successful assessment practices while providing participants with dialogic spaces to adjust findings to their contexts. Attendees’ tangible takeaway will also include: ideas to enhance visual input, tools to develop students’ metacognition and useful tips to progress from ‘what works’ to ‘what works best’ to improve students’ results.

24. GÓMEZ, María Laura; GARCÍA, Aurelia

Particularity in Action  CANCELED

Workshop

Room 103

During this workshop, attendants will work collaboratively on developing a didactic sequence considering the specific needs of a particular group of students. The assessment of needs will indicate what learners have to learn, what they like to learn, and what they have not yet learned, corresponding to learner needs, wants, and lacks. Attendants will be challenged to explore the application of a TBL framework where students become involved in some instruction decisions. In the last stage of this workshop, the presenters will foster a round up reflection, where the attendants will discuss considerations on applying the developed sequence.

05. May 2019 · Write a comment · Categories: NEWS

Venezuela TESOL (VenTESOL) and the Central American and Caribbean BASIN TESOL Affiliates cordially invite you to the “Overcoming the challenges when teaching content subject matters in elementary and high school” Youtube live session.

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Abstract:

Nowadays, it has become troublesome for instructors to teach content classes in L2 settings where students do not know English yet or have a very poor proficiency level. Some teachers have gone for switching to L1 when teaching the content in order for students to learn, in another scenario teachers have focused on teaching English only and not the content. Therefore, this workshop is for teachers who are already teaching – or in the future plan to teach content classes (Math, Science, History, etc.) at bilingual institutions, in elementary or high school. Besides, it will provide teachers with a variety of techniques that will help them teach content competently, adjust the difficulty of tasks to make lessons appropriate for students that are learning content in L2, formulate measurable language and content objectives, create lessons that will promote and maximize students’ language and content learning. Moreover, it will help teachers maintain a balanced teaching of both language and content by facilitating hands-on activities that are supported by the necessary background and theoretical information.

Presenter Bio:

Meindert Montenegro, currently works at UCA University and ACCESS program in Nicaragua, holds a Master in Education, bachelor degree in TEFL, a graduate course in Content Based Instruction and has taken two international certification programs, one of them at Hunter College and the second one in SIT TESOL at Centro Espiral Mana, Costa Rica. He has also been in charge of two MOOC camps, one about Content- Based Instruction and another one about Teaching Grammar Communicatively. Mr. Montenegro has taught English for 13 years and Social Studies for 7 years. He has also been a presenter at The NicaTESOL conference, HELTA Tesol in Honduras, BETA Tesol in Bolivia, EFL Talks, and workshops done in the Caribbean Region of Nicaragua.

Date: May 12th (Sunday)

Time: 9:00 Nicaragua time

16:00 GMT

11:00 Venezuela time

If you need extra help checking your local time, we invite you to visit www.worldtimebuddy.com so you can compare your time with any of the ones offered on the schedule.

Registration form: https://bit.ly/2XLzZqq

Youtube link: https://bit.ly/2UHkBJT