Dr. Dudley Reynolds

Teaching Professor of English, Carnegie Mellon University, Qatar

Dudley Reynolds is the 2016-17 President of the TESOL International Association and a Professor of English at Carnegie Mellon University in Doha, Qatar where he teaches first-year writing. He has previously taught in MA TESOL, intensive English, and elementary school programs.

His research fDudley Reynolds2ocuses on the development, instruction, and assessment of second language literacy. He is the author of One on One with Second Language Writers: A Guide for Writing Tutors, Teachers, and Consultants (University of Michigan Press, 2009) and Assessing Writing, Assessing Learning (University of Michigan Press, 2010). He is the recipient of two major grants from the Qatar National Research Fund: “Improving Reading Skills in the Middle School Science Classroom” (Lead PI) and “Learning4Teaching Qatar: Understanding Qatari teachers’ experiences and use of Professional Development in English language teaching” (Co-PI).

Writing Rubrics for Learning – Plenary

In this talk, we consider three challenges that must be overcome if we are to use rubrics as a tool for student learning. First, how can we design a rubric that emphasizes common goals for learning while acknowledging that each students has individual abilities and needs? Second, what aspects of writing should the rubric evaluate? Thirdly, how can we make rubrics meaningful for students?

Teaching Organization for Writing – Workshop

Ever looked at a student’s paper and felt completely puzzled by what they are trying to say? The vocabulary is appropriate. The sentence structure seems mixed up in places, but you can understand what was intended. But when you read the text as a whole, you feel like a ball on a squash court. You know the issue is organization, but how do you address it? In this workshop we will use sample essays to consider why students may have problems organizing their writing, how we can work with them one on one, and finally how we can teach organization to a whole class without dictating what to write.